Saturday, 29 June 2013

Vogue 8150 - wedding dress pattern and materials

Thank you all for your kind comments on my last post! I really appreciate them - eloping was not an easy decision for me (more to come on that later), and your support made me smile.

V8150

Now, onto the dress sewing. I used Vogue 8150. The pattern photo and drawings are extremely uninspiring and naff, to my eye. However, there were a few reasons I chose this pattern (view B):

  • I wanted 'floaty'. Specifically, silk georgette. Most formal dresses are for stiffer/firmer/more opaque fabrics, and this was one of the few that could be made with lighter fabric.
  • I did not want a strapless style.
  • Princess lines allowed for easier pattern adjustments.
  • There had to be enough coverage at the back and the front to allow a good bra/torsolette to go underneath.
So with those restrictions, there were surprisingly few patterns left to choose from! Vogue 1030 was the only other serious contender... but ultimately I decided that the empire line would make me look larger than I am. It's just not the right shape for me.


This pattern had some added bonuses. A slightly dropped waist is a good style for me. The ruching also camouflages a less-than-rock-hard upper body. The skirt being slightly higher at the instep reduced the chance of tripping over at an outdoor ceremony! Also, the pattern was not totally beyond my skill level. It was very time-consuming, but not necessarily difficult.

I used nearly 8 yards of ivory silk georgette, with about 4 yards of 16mm silk crepe de chine for lining and underlining. A note on this - the two layers of the skirt are only just opaque enough for my liking. Strong light behind me would show everything! The crepe de chine was a perfect weight for the floaty skirt though. I think if I did it again, I would actually do two layers of lining in the skirt.

Contrasting Gutermann silk thread was used for tracing the pattern pieces, as well as for basting. For permanent hand-sewing, I used a matching silk thread. Silk thread made the hand-sewing much smoother, as it doesn't snag going through the fabric. I just used regular Gutermann thread for the machine sewing. I tacked down the ruching using some small Swarovski crystals for interest. 

How do you choose the style of an important outfit? Trends in magazines, personal wish-list, thinking about body shape, or other considerations?


Note: My next post will talk about the sewing techniques and instructions that I used.

12 comments:

  1. Hey, you used that pattern! I look forward to hearing what you thought of it. I've always liked it but I read a bad review and was discouraged (plus didn't have an excuse to make it). I really like the sound of the silk double georgette and crepe de chine, especially for a tropical wedding. A wedding is such a good justification for buying the gorgeous expensive fabrics.

    KathleenS

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    Replies
    1. It's hard for me to judge the quality of the pattern, because I went into it knowing I'd need to make adjustments and spend a lot of time on it. For example I read some reviews that had problems with the bodice lining, but I can't say I had any major dramas. It also helped that I used Claire Shaeffer's book to inform my techniques, rather than relying on the pattern.

      Ultimately I think my dress matches the pattern drawings, and I didn't have to remake any part of it - so I think that's a win, if it's a style that you like!

      I agree completely that a wedding is a good justification for nice fabric :-)

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  2. Again, a beautiful job on your dress! I love the idea of a floaty skirt, especially for a beach wedding.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Shannon! I couldn't imagine wearing a stiff ballgown on a beach, so I thought the floatiness was ideal too :-)

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  3. Wowsers, 8 yards of deliciously floaty silk! That's a lot. Did you double up to increase the opacity (if that's even a word...?) or was that the requirement? Love the pic of the gathers up close :)
    I totally think you made the right pattern choice though - it really is such a flattering line on you. Although I do thank you for bringing Vogue 1030 to my attention - it's rather lovely!! Especially if it were made up in a soft-toned hot pink silk like in the drawing ;) yum.
    I look forward to reading more about it all!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nope, that's pretty much the pattern requirement. I may have used a smidge more in the seam allowances, and a little extra because of the FBA... but the dress really does use about 12 yards of fabric in total. If I'd done an extra layer of lining on the skirt, I would have used an extra few yards!

      Vogue 1030 is indeed lovely. I'm still thinking about making it - but I'm not sure what for! With the amount of fabric involved, it probably wouldn't be made of silk though.

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  4. These ruched dresses are so lovely, and very forgiving - it is a lovely dress, and 8 metres of chiffon sounds about right.

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    1. Ruching was just about the only way to achieve 'floaty' without having to worry about 'clingy' - I like this style too.

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  5. How amazingly beautiful! A little Midsummers Night Dream?!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks! And I hadn't thought of that as a style inspiration, but why not :-)

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  6. Kat. I can see this would also make a wonderful evening dress or a day dress for high tea. You've done so much work on it that I can see you could use it to look amazing at any event with different fabric.

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    Replies
    1. You're right, the pattern could definitely be adapted to different occasions with different fabric. I like patterns with a few options!

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